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Flying Dog Loop

 4 votes

16.9 Miles 27.1 Kilometers



1,935' 590 m


-1,935' -590 m


7,768' 2,368 m


6,350' 1,935 m



Avg Grade (2°)


Max Grade (12°)


7,768' 2,368 m


6,350' 1,935 m



Avg Grade (2°)


Max Grade (12°)

A classic Park City singletrack journey; without all of the Ski Resort crowds.

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Featured Ride


This hot, dusty, and sun-exposed route is a great test for riders looking to gain some fitness and get used to the loose dirt Park City has on offer.

If you're feeling bold and want to expand your riding repertoire to something a little more downhill oriented, drop-in on some of the Bob's Basin trails near the end of this route.
Family Friendly: Bring the kids - especially for Stealth Trail and Glenwild Loop. The views are great and the obstacles aren't too overwhelming.

Need To Know

Be sure to bring a lot of water. This is also a good one to try into the fall or early spring as it stays drier due to sun exposure and valley elevation. On low-snow years, portions or all of this loop could be rideable in winter.


Starting from the main trailhead, head north on the gravel bike path, then crossover Glenwild Road to start the Stealth Trail. Although uphill for this section, the mellow switchbacks will bring you to an intersection with Glenwild Loop before you know it. At the top of the climb, turn right onto Glenwild Loop, which affords great views across the valley to the ski resorts immediately.

Glenwild Loop contours to the east then drops lazily through tight, loose, sagebrush-filled singletrack. Don't miss the semi-jumps here, you can grab some easy air if you're up for it - otherwise they're all rollable. After you've gotten your whoops on the downhill, cross Glenwild Drive and bear left to stay on Glenwild Loop. The trail rises slightly, then comes to an open intersection with Cobblestone Loop; did I mention how sun-exposed this ride is?

Turn right onto Cobblestone Loop; an easy, ascending grind to an intersection with Flying Dog - the meat of this ride. Cobblestone Loop is a lollipop, be sure to stay right at the first intersection you encounter.

Once you reach Flying Dog, enter it and immediately cross West Deer Hill Road. Flying Dog is by far the hardest part of this ride - get ready for tight, steep, and exposed switchbacks. If you're cognizant enough to count while ascending this trail, there are 16 exposed switchbacks. The top of the trail is at an intersection with "No Road Here" road, where there is a nice bench to sit and relax on. Once you've had your fill of relaxing, fly on down the other side through Aspens and Pines. Be on the lookout for Moose and other wildlife on this descent - many have been spotted in the marshy areas!

At the bottom of Flying Dog you'll intersect 24-7 - turn left. 24-7 flies through sun-exposed and almost always hot terrain, but using this trail is a necessity when navigating from Flying Dog. If you like riding through thick stands of sagebrush and some intermittent trees on tight singletrack, however, then 24-7 is the trail for you. Be sure to keep an eye out for uphill traffic, especially near the Bob's Basin trails (24-7's southern extent) - there are generally a lot of other users in this area.

Stay straight on Stealth Trail and follow its smooth, easy contours back to the parking lot!


Land Manager: Basin Recreation

Rate Featured Ride


4.3 from 4 votes

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Your Check-Ins


Oct 22, 2016
Bryan Leuenhagen
Oct 15, 2016
Jen Vogel Gotantas
Sep 21, 2016
Ellie Avant
Lots of rocky ascents
Sep 20, 2016
John Forz
Sep 9, 2016
Mike Hogan
Fantastic loop. 17mi — 3h 10m
Aug 20, 2016
Rawley Nielsen
Aug 15, 2016
Peng Li
Jul 7, 2016
Rick Shelton
3h 11m

Trail Ratings

  4.3 from 4 votes


  4.3 from 4 votes
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