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North Borrego Trail #150

 1 vote

6.3 Miles 10.1 Kilometers


Singletrack

1,096' 334 m

Ascent

-1,763' -537 m

Descent

9,229' 2,813 m

High

8,214' 2,504 m

Low

9%

Avg Grade (5°)

21%

Max Grade (12°)

Minor Issues

10 days agoUpdate

A giant backcountry trail that goes for miles and makes the eastern edge of the Rancho Viejo ride.

Phil Lucero

Overview

These trails are deep in the backcountry so come prepared (food, water and medical supplies). Watch for wildlife and always make way for hikers and backpackers.
Dogs: Leashed

Description

This trail is out there! The Borrego Trail starts about a mile north of the ranger station on Highway 475. That southern portion of the trail is by far the most popular as it makes up the Borrego Trail - Bear Wallow Trail 182 loop (which is popular for hikers and bikers). The little-known northern stretch is where this trail stretches it legs. Bikers can only go so far however as the trail crosses into the Pecos Wilderness just north of the Rio Capulin.

The northern and southern portions of this trail are connected by other trails. The Borrego Trail seems to end at the Winsor Trail, but it actually borrows part of the Winsor as it climbs up to the Pacheco Canyon Road #102. Here, the Borrego Trail again borrows the road and even borrows State Road 412 up to Aspen Ranch before legitimately becoming its own trail again about 100 yards north of the Aspen Ranch parking area.

Once you are on legit singletrack again, the trail is awesome. This is perhaps the best part of the trail as it winds downhill through a lush pine forest. This part of the trail is borrowed as well, but this time by the Rio en Medio Trail as it serves as a connector between the Upper Rio En Medio #163 and Lower Rio en Medio #163. I guess you could say the Borrego Trail is a community trail, if there ever was one!

Once north of the Rio en Medio, the Borrego Trail is all alone however. While the trail is not as challenging as the Rio en Medio, it is certainly no slouch. Its remoteness should cause some consternation as well, as an injury out here could be perilous.

Soon, you'll get to the Rio Nambe Trail #160 that follows the Rio Nambe to the south. You can take this trail or continue on in a northern direction to ride the Rancho Viejo loop. These are both great rides. If you choose to continue north, be warned that a recent forest fire has decimated the area and you may be short on shade. This section was once unrideable but trail crews have cleaned the place up nicely and it is fit to ride once again!

You'll climb a steep ridge line and come back down the Rio Capulin Trail back down toward the Rio Nambe. From here, you can ride back toward the Rio en Medio on the daunting Viejo Trail #179 or ride up the Rio Nambe. Either way, you are in for a huge day of riding if you find yourself out this far. Pack a lunch (or two!).

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#2

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#6702

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#2

in Santa Fe

#167

in New Mexico

#6,702

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254 Since Feb 1, 2017
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Conditions


Minor Issues 10 days ago
Dry, Icy, Fallen Trees
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